2024 L île de tortuga

Tortuga (Haiti) – Wikipedia Jump to content Main menu Main menu move to sidebar hide Navigation Main pageContentsCurrent eventsRandom articleAbout WikipediaContact usDonate Contribute HelpLearn to editCommunity portalRecent changesUpload file Languages Language links are at the top of the page. Search Search Create account Log in Personal tools Create account Log in Pages for logged out editors learn more ContributionsTalk Contents move to sidebar hide (Top) 1History 2Geography 3In popular culture Toggle In popular culture subsection 3.1Films 3.2Literature 3.3Music 3.4Video Games 3.5Rafael Sabatini’s works 3.5.1Captain Blood 3.5.2The Black Swan 4Notable people 5See also 6References 7External links Toggle the table of contents Tortuga (Haiti) 44 languages العربيةBân-lâm-gúБеларускаяБеларуская (тарашкевіца)БългарскиBrezhonegCatalàCebuanoČeštinaDanskDeutschΕλληνικάEspañolEsperantoEuskaraفارسیFrançais한국어ՀայերենHrvatskiBahasa IndonesiaItalianoעבריתKiswahiliKreyòl ayisyenLatinaLietuviųMagyarمصرىNederlands日本語Norsk bokmålNorsk nynorskPolskiPortuguêsRomânăРусскийSimple EnglishСрпски / srpskiSuomiSvenskaTürkçeУкраїнська中文 Edit links ArticleTalk English ReadEditView history Tools Tools move to sidebar hide Actions ReadEditView history General What links hereRelated changesUpload fileSpecial pagesPermanent linkPage informationCite this pageGet shortened URLWikidata item Edit interlanguage links Print/export Download as PDFPrintable version In other projects Wikimedia CommonsWikivoyage Coordinates: 20°02′23′′N 72°47′24′′W / 20.03972°N 72.79000°W / 20.03972; -72.79000 From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia For other islands with similar names, see Tortuga Island. Island in Nord-Ouest, HaitiTortuga Île de la TortueLatòtiIslandTortuga seen from spaceTortugaA map of Haiti with Île de la Tortue to the north.Coordinates: 20°02′23′′N 72°47′24′′W / 20.03972°N 72.79000°W / 20.03972; -72.79000CountryHaitiDepartmentNord-OuestArrondissementPort-de-PaixSettled1625Area • Total180 km2 (69 sq mi)Elevation459 m (1,506 ft)Population (2003) • Total25,936 • Density144/km2 (376/sq mi)Time zone−5 • Summer (DST)−4ClimateAf Tortuga Island[1][2] (French: Île de la Tortue, IPA: [il də la tɔʁty]; Haitian Creole: Latòti; Spanish: Isla Tortuga, IPA: [ˈisla toɾˈtuɣa], Turtle Island) is a Caribbean island that forms part of Haiti, off the northwest coast of Hispaniola. It constitutes the commune of Île de la Tortue in the Port-de-Paix arrondissement of the Nord-Ouest department of Haiti. Tortuga is 180 square kilometres (69 square miles)[3] in size and had a population of 25,936 at the 2003 census. In the 17th century, Tortuga was a major center and haven of Caribbean piracy. Its tourist industry and references in many works have made it one of the most recognized regions of Haiti. History[edit] The first Europeans to land on Tortuga were the Spanish in 1492 during the first voyage of Christopher Columbus into the New World. On December 6, 1492, three Spanish ships entered the Windward Passage that separates Cuba and Haiti. At sunrise, Columbus noticed an island whose contours emerged from the morning mist. Because the shape reminded him of a turtle’s shell, he chose the name of Tortuga.[4][5][6] Tortuga was originally settled by a few Spanish colonists under the Captaincy General of Santo Domingo. In 1625, French and English colonists from Saint Kitts arrived on the island of Tortuga after initially planning to settle on mainland Hispaniola.[7] The French and English settlers were attacked in 1629 by the Spanish commanded by Don Fadrique de Toledo, who fortified the island, and expelled the French and English. As most of the Spanish Army left for Hispaniola to root out French colonists there, the French returned in 1630 to occupy the fort and expanded the Spanish-built fortifications. From 1630 onward, the island of Tortuga was divided into French and English colonies, allowing buccaneers to use the island as their main base of operations. In 1633, the first slaves were imported from Africa to aid in the plantations. However, by 1635 the use of slaves had ended. The slaves were said to be out of control on the island, while at the same time there had been continuous disagreements and fighting between French and English colonies. In 1635, Spain recaptured Tortuga from the English and French, expelled them and left. As they soon returned, Spain conquered the English and French colonies for a second time, only to leave again because the island was too small to be of major importance. This allowed the return of both French and English pirates. In 1638, the Spanish returned for a third time to take the island and rid it of all French and the newly settled Dutch. They occupied the island, but were expelled by the French and Dutch colonists in 1640, at which time the French built Fort de Rocher in a natural harbour; the fort enabled the French to defeat a Spanish invasion force the following year. A drawing of Tortuga island from the 17th century. By 1640, the buccaneers of Tortuga were calling themselves the Brethren of the Coast. The pirate population was mostly made up of French and Englishmen, along with a small number of Dutchmen. In 1654, the Spanish captured the island for the fourth and last time.[8] In 1655, Tortuga was reoccupied by English and French interlopers under Elias Watts, who secured a commission from Col. William Brayne, acting as military Governor on Jamaica, to serve as “Governor” of Tortuga. In 1660, England appointed a Frenchman Jeremie Dechamps as Governor who proclaimed suzerainty to the King of France, set up French colours, and defeated several English attempts to reclaim the island.[9] In 1664, a French governor brought 400 French colonists for the island from his home province of Anjou, who established Hispaniola’s first sugar plantations since the first wave of European colonization. This group of colonists spread to the coast of the mainland and became the nexus of the French colony of Saint-Domingue.[7] By 1670, the buccaneer era was in decline, and many of the pirates turned to log cutting and wood trading as a new income source. At this time, a Welsh privateer named Henry Morgan started to promote himself and invited the pirates on the island of Tortuga to set sail under him. Morgan and some 2,000 privateers then attacked and sacked Panama the following year. They were hired by the French as a striking force that allowed France to have a much stronger hold on the Caribbean region. Consequently, the pirates never really controlled the island and kept Tortuga as a neutral hideout for pirate booty. In 1680, new Acts of Parliament forbade sailing under foreign flags (in opposition to former practice). This was a major legal blow to the Caribbean pirates. Settlements were made in the Treaty of Ratisbon of 1684, signed by the European powers, that put an end to piracy. Most of the pirates after this time were hired out into the Royal services to suppress their former buccaneer allies. The capital of Saint-Domingue was moved from Tortuga to Port-de-Paix on the mainland of Hispaniola in 1676. Geography[edit] LighthouseTortuga Lighthouse (east point) LocationTortuga, Haiti Coordinates19°59′49′′N 72°37′17′′W / 19.9969°N 72.6214°W / 19.9969; -72.6214TowerConstructed1924 Constructionconcrete towerHeight14 m (46 ft) Shapetapered cylindrical tower with light[10][11]Markingswhite and red horizontal band towerLightFocal height23.5 m (77 ft) Range14 nmi (26 km; 16 mi) CharacteristicFl(2) W 6s The island of Tortuga stands off the northern coast of Haiti. It is very mountainous and rocky; the rocks are especially abundant on the northern part of the island. At the beginning of the 17th century, the population lived on the southern coast of the island, where there was a port for ships to enter. The northern shore was described as inaccessible via both land and sea. The inhabited area was divided into four parts; the first of these was called “Low Land” or “Low Country”. This region contained the island’s port and was therefore considered the most important. The town was called Cayona, and the richest planters of the island lived there. The second region was called the “Middle Plantation”; the farmers of this region were unfamiliar with the soil and it was only used to grow tobacco. The third part was named “La Ringot”, and was positioned on the western portion of the island. The fourth region was called the “La Montagne” (the Mountain); it is there that the first cultivated plantations were established upon the island. This 17th century geography is known largely from Alexandre-Olivier Exquemelin’s detailed description in his book Zeerovers,[12] where he describes a 1666 journey to the island. In popular culture[edit] Tortuga has been portrayed in many works depicting piracy in the Caribbean in the 17th and 18th centuries. Films[edit] Tortuga has been featured in numerous films, including Safe in Hell (1931) Captain Blood (1935) The Black Swan (1942) The Spanish Main (1945) Double Crossbones (1950) Abbott and Costello Meet Captain Kidd (1952) Pirates of Tortuga (1961) Pirates of the Caribbean films Main article: List of locations in Pirates of the Caribbean § Tortuga Literature[edit] Books featuring the island include: Deadmen Walking: A Deadman’s Cross Novel (2017) by Sherrilyn Kenyon Tortuga by Valerio Evangelisti Lovesong by Valerie Sherwood Caribbean (1989) by James Michener The Black Swan (1932) by Rafael Sabatini The Black Corsair series of novels by Emilio Salgari (1898-1908) The Black Avenger of the Spanish Main (1847) by Ned Buntline The Dark Secret of Josephine (1955) by Dennis Wheatley 1637: No Peace Beyond the Line (November 2020) by Eric Flint and Charles E. Gannon Music[edit] Tortuga is mentioned in multiple songs, including: “Jonas Psalter” (1973) by the rock band Styx “Night in Tortuga” (1986) by Norman Dozier “Tortuga Bay” (1989) by German heavy metal band Running Wild “Tortuga” (2006) by Italian Ska band Talco “Jack Sparrow” by The Lonely Island featuring Michael Bolton “Tortuga” (2011) by Welsh band Catfish and the Bottlemen “Welcome to Tortuga” (2012) by Swedish pirate folk band Ye Banished Privateers “Tortuga” (2014) by the space rock band Earthling Society “Tortuga” and “Gute Nacht Tortuga”, both from the album “Tortuga” (2017) by German pirate folk band Mr. Hurley & die Pulveraffen [de] “Tortuga” (2020) and “Return to Tortuga” (2022) by the Scottish Pirate Metal Band Alestorm “Turtle Island” (2002) by Mike Oldfield Video Games[edit] Assassin’s Creed IV: Black Flag (2014) Pirates of the Caribbean Online (2007) Tortuga: Two Treasures (2007) Rafael Sabatini’s works[edit] Captain Blood[edit] Tortuga is featured in Rafael Sabatini’s Captain Blood series and the movies based on it; the most famous is Captain Blood (1935) starring Errol Flynn. It is the place where Blood and his crew find refuge after their escape from Barbados in 1685. Blood receives a Letter of Marque from Tortuga’s governor, D’Ogeron, and the island becomes his main base for the next four years. He starts his raids from Cayona, and several events in the books take place on Tortuga itself or on ships anchoring in the harbour of Cayona. Sabatini used Exquemelin’s History of the Bouccaneers of America as a main source for his description of Tortuga, and therefore the island is portrayed as a place where many buccaneers, prostitutes, and other dubious professions operate, but the French West India Company, which rules Tortuga, makes profit off of those affairs. The Black Swan[edit] Tortuga also features in Sabatini’s novel The Black Swan and the 1942 movie based on it.[13] Notable people[edit] Gabard Fénélon, professional football player Hugues Gentillon, film director, and founder of Yugy Pictures Entertainment See also[edit] Haiti portalEngineering portal List of islands of Haiti List of lighthouses in Haiti Geography of Pirates of the Caribbean Port Royal Tortuga (cocktail) References[edit] ^ United States, Hydrographic Office (1891). “Catalogue of Charts, Plans, Sailing Directions, and Other Publications of the Office, July 1, 1891”. p. 34. Retrieved 14 July 2015. ^ Royal Geographical Society (Great Britain); Shaw, Norton; Greenfield, Hume; Bates, Henry Walter (1834). “The Journal of the Royal Geographical Society”. p. 130. Retrieved 14 July 2015. ^ Schutt-Ainé, Patricia (1994). Haiti: A Basic Reference Book. Miami, Florida: Librairie Au Service de la Culture. p. 20. ISBN 0-9638599-0-0. ^ “Ile de la tortue, Histoire. Petite histoire de l’île de la tortue”. Villa Camp Mandingue. Haiti. Archived from the original on 28 October 2012. Retrieved 24 July 2012. ^ “Cristóbal Colón en La Española”. Amautacuna de Historia. 2010-10-24. ^ “Diario de a bordo del primer viaje de Cristóbal Colón: texto completo. 6 de Diciembre”. Wikisource. 1492. Retrieved 24 July 2012. ^ Jump up to: a b Dubois, Laurent (2005). Avengers of the New World: The Story of the Haitian Revolution. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press. pp. 15–17. ISBN 978-0-674-03436-5. OCLC 663393691. ^ The Buccaneers In The West Indies In The XVII Century – Chapter IV ^ The Buccaneers In The West Indies In The XVII Century – Chapter IV ^ Rowlett, Russ. “Lighthouses of Haiti”. The Lighthouse Directory. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Retrieved 2017-01-20. ^ List of Lights, Pub. 110: Greenland, The East Coasts of North and South America (Excluding Continental U.S.A. Except the East Coast of Florida) and the West Indies (PDF). List of Lights. United States National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency. 2016. ^ Exquemelin, Alexander (2003). Zeerovers. ‘s-Hertogenbosch: Voltaire B.V. pp. 18–20. ISBN 90-5848-044-5. ^ “Movie Review — At the Roxy – NYTimes.com”. The New York Times. Retrieved 2017-10-27. (2003) Pancorbo, Luis: “El Canal de la Tortuga” en “Río de América”. pp. 321–333. Laertes, Barcelona. ISBN 84-7584-506-1 External links[edit] Wikimedia Commons has media related to Île de la Tortue. (In English and Spanish) “Method of Securing the Ports and Populations of All the Coasts of the Indies”, from 1694, discusses Tortuga’s history with piracy. vte Departments, arrondissements and communes of HaitiArtiboniteDessalines Arrondissement Desdunes Dessalines Grande Saline Petite Rivière de l’Artibonite Gonaïves Arrondissement Ennery L’Estère Gonaïves Gros-Morne Arrondissement Anse-Rouge Gros-Morne Terre-Neuve Marmelade Arrondissement Marmelade Saint-Michel-de-l’Atalaye Saint-Marc Arrondissement La Chapelle Saint-Marc Verrettes CentreCerca-la-Source Arrondissement Cerca-la-Source Thomassique Hinche Arrondissement Cerca-Cavajal Hinche Maïssade Thomonde Lascahobas Arrondissement Belladère Lascahobas Savanette Mirebalais Arrondissement Boucan-Carré Mirebalais Saut-d’Eau Grand’AnseAnse d’Hainault Arrondissement Anse-d’Hainault Dame-Marie Les Irois Corail Arrondissement Beaumont Corail Pestel Roseaux Jérémie Arrondissement Abricots Bonbon Chambellan Jérémie Moron Other Navassa Island NippesAnse-à-Veau Arrondissement Anse-à-Veau L’Asile Baradères Petit-Trou-de-Nippes Miragoâne Arrondissement Miragoâne Petite-Rivière-de-Nippes NordAcul du Nord Arrondissement Acul-du-Nord Milot Plaine-du-Nord Borgne Arrondissement Borgne Port-Margot Cap-Haïtien Arrondissement Cap-Haïtien Limonade Quartier-Morin Grande-Rivière-du-Nord Arrondissement Bahon Grande-Rivière-du-Nord Limbé Arrondissement Bas-Limbé Limbé Plaisance Arrondissement Pilate Plaisance Saint-Raphaël Arrondissement Dondon La Victoire Pignon Ranquitte Saint-Raphaël Nord-EstFort-Liberté Arrondissement Fort-Liberté Perches Ferrier Ouanaminthe Arrondissement Capotille Mont-Organisé Ouanaminthe Trou-du-Nord Arrondissement Caracol Sainte-Suzanne Terrier-Rouge Trou-du-Nord Vallières Arrondissement Carice Mombin-Crochu Vallières Nord-OuestMôle-Saint-Nicolas Arrondissement Baie-de-Henne Bombardopolis Jean-Rabel Môle-Saint-Nicolas Port-de-Paix Arrondissement Bassin-Bleu Chansolme La Tortue Port-de-Paix Saint-Louis-du-Nord Arrondissement Anse-à-Foleur Saint-Louis-du-Nord OuestArcahaie Arrondissement Arcahaie Cabaret Croix-des-Bouquets Arrondissement Cornillon Croix-des-Bouquets Fonds-Verrettes Ganthier Thomazeau La Gonâve Arrondissement Anse-à-Galets Pointe-à-Raquette Léogâne Arrondissement Grand-Goâve Léogâne Petit-Goâve Port-au-Prince Arrondissement Carrefour Delmas Gressier Kenscoff Pétion-Ville Tabarre Cité Soleil Port-au-Prince Sud-EstBainet Arrondissement Bainet Côtes-de-Fer Belle-Anse Arrondissement Anse-à-Pitres Belle-Anse Grand-Gosier Thiotte Jacmel Arrondissement Cayes-Jacmel Jacmel La Vallée Marigot SudAquin Arrondissement Aquin Cavaellon Saint-Louis-du-Sud Les Cayes Arrondissement Camp-Perrin Les Cayes Chantal Île à Vache Maniche Torbeck Chardonnières Arrondissement Les Anglais Chardonnières Tiburon Côteaux Arrondissement Côteaux Port-à-Piment Roche-à-Bateaux Port-Salut Arrondissement Arniquet Port-Salut Saint-Jean-du-Sud Haiti portal vtePiracyPeriods Ancient Mediterranean Golden Age 21st century Types of pirate Albanian piracy Anglo-Turkish piracy Baltic Slavic pirates Barbary pirates (corsairs) Brethren of the Coast Buccaneers Cilician pirates Child pirate Cossack pirates Fillibusters French corsairs Jewish pirates Moro pirates Narentines Privateers Confederate privateer River pirate Sea Beggars Sea Dogs Sindhi corsairs Timber pirate Ushkuyniks Uskoks Vikings Victual Brothers Wokou Women in piracy AreasAtlantic World Caribbean British Virgin Islands Spanish Main Lake Nicaragua Venezuela Gulf of Guinea Indian Ocean Horn of Africa Somali Coast Indonesia Persian Gulf Strait of Malacca Nosy Boraha Other waters Baltic Slavic piracy Barbary Coast Falcon Lake South China Coast Sulu Sea Pirate havensand bases Barataria Bay Île Sainte-Marie Libertatia Lundy Mamora Port Royal Republic of Pirates Republic of Salé Saint Augustin Saint-Malo Tortuga Major figuresPirates Abduwali Muse Abshir Boyah Adam Baldridge Abraham Samuel Alfhild Albert W. Hicks Anne Bonny Anne Dieu-le-Veut António de Faria Alexandre Exquemelin Artemisia I of Caria Awilda Bartolomeu Português Bartholomew Roberts Benito de Soto Benjamin Hornigold Black Caesar Blackbeard Bully Hayes Cai Qian Calico Jack Charles Gibbs Charlotte de Berry Cheung Po Tsai Christina Anna Skytte Chui A-poo Dan Seavey Diabolito Dido Dirk Chivers Dominique You Edward England Edward Low Eli Boggs Elise Eskilsdotter Eustace the Monk Flora Burn Flying Gang Fūma Kotarō Francis Drake François Le Clerc François l’Olonnais Gan Ning Grace O’Malley Hayreddin Barbarossa Hendrick Lucifer Henri Caesar Henry Every Henry Morgan Henry Strangways Hippolyte Bouchard Huang Bamei Israel Hands Jacquotte Delahaye Jan Janszoon Jean Lafitte Jeanne de Clisson Johanna Hård John Hawkins John Hoar John Newland Maffitt John Pro Jørgen Jørgensen José Joaquim Almeida Joseph Baker Joseph Barss Klaus Störtebeker Lai Choi San Laurens de Graaf Lawrence Prince Liang Daoming Limahong Lo Hon-cho Louis-Michel Aury Mansel Alcantra Manuel Ribeiro Pardal Martin Frobisher Mary Lindsey Mary Read Mary Wolverston Michel de Grammont Moses Cohen Henriques Nathaniel Gordon Nicholas van Hoorn Ng Akew Olivier Levasseur Pedro Gilbert Peter Easton Pierre Lafitte Piet Pieterszoon Hein Princess Sela Rahmah ibn Jabir al-Jalhami Rachel Wall Redbeard Richard Glover Robert Culliford Robert Surcouf Roberto Cofresí Roche Braziliano Rusla Sadie Farrell Samuel Bellamy Samuel Hall Lord Samuel Mason Samuel Pallache Sayyida al Hurra Sister Ping Shap-ng-tsai Shirahama Kenki Simon Mascarino Stede Bonnet Teuta Thomas Cavendish Thomas Tew Veborg Victual Brothers Vincenzo Gambi Wang Zhi William Dampier William Kidd Zheng Jing Zheng Qi Zheng Yi Zheng Zhilong Zheng Yi Sao Piratehunters Angelo Emo Chaloner Ogle David Porter Duarte Pacheco Pereira James Brooke Julius Caesar Jose Campuzano-Polanco Luis Fajardo Miguel Enríquez Pedro Menéndez de Avilés Pompey Richard Avery Hornsby Robert Maynard Thomas Warren Woodes Rogers Pirate ships Adventure Galley Ambrose Light Fancy Flying Dutchman Ganj-i-Sawai Queen Anne’s Revenge Quedagh Merchant Marquis of Havana My Revenge Royal Fortune Saladin Whydah Gally York Pirate battles and incidents 1582 Cagayan battles 1985 Lahad Datu ambush Action of 9 November 1822 Action of 28 October 2007 Action of 11 November 2008 Action of 9 April 2009 Action of 23 March 2010 Action of 1 April 2010 Action of 5 April 2010 Anti-piracy in the Aegean Antelope incident Anti-piracy in the West Indies Attack on Veracruz Balanguingui Expedition Battle of Boca Teacapan Battle of Cape Fear River Battle of Cape Lopez Battle of Doro Passage Battle of Mandab Strait Battle of Manila Battle off Minicoy Island Battle off Mukah Battle of Nam Quan Battle of New Orleans Battle of Ocracoke Inlet Battle of Pianosa Battle of the Leotung Battle of the Tiger’s Mouth Battle of Tonkin River Battle of Ty-ho Bay Battle of Tysami Beluga Nomination incident Blockade of Charleston (Vane) Chepo Expedition Capture of the Ambrose Light Capture of John “Calico Jack” Rackham Capture of the schooner Bravo Capture of the schooner Fancy Capture of the sloop Anne Carré d’As IV incident Dai Hong Dan incident Falklands Expedition Great Lakes Patrol Irene incident Jiajing wokou raids Maersk Alabama hijacking MT Zafirah hijacking MT Orkim Harmony hijacking MV Moscow University hijacking North Star affair Operation Enduring Freedom – HOA Operation Atalanta Operation Dawn of Gulf of Aden Operation Dawn 8: Gulf of Aden Operation Ocean Shield Persian Gulf Campaign Pirate attacks in Borneo Quest incident Raid on Cartagena Sack of Baltimore Sack of Campeche Salvador Pirates Slave raid of Suðuroy Turkish AbductionsPiracy law Acts of grace (1717–1718 Acts of Grace) International piracy law Letter of marque Paris Declaration Respecting Maritime Law Piracy Act (1536, 1698, 1717, 1721, 1837, 1850) Piracy Law of 1820 Slave trade African slave trade African Slave Trade Patrol Amistad Incident Atlantic slave trade Barbary slave trade Blockade of Africa Capture of the Veloz Passagera Capture of the brig Brillante Indian Ocean slave trade Trans-Saharan slave trade Pirates inpopularcultureFictional pirates Askeladd Tom Ayrton Barbe Rouge Captain Birdseye Captain Blood Captain Crook Captain Flint Boa Hancock Captain Hook Captain Nemo Captain Pugwash Captain Sabertooth Captain Stingaree Charlotte de Berry Davy Jones Edward Kenway Elaine Marley Elizabeth Swann Guybrush Threepwood Hector Barbossa Jack Sparrow Jacquotte Delahaye José Gaspar Joshamee Gibbs LeChuck Long John Silver Monkey D. Luffy Vaas Montenegro Mr. Smee Nami Nico Robin Red Rackham Roronoa Zoro Sandokan Sanji Tony Tony Chopper Usopp Will Turner Zanzibar Novels The Pirate The Pilot: A Tale of the Sea Treasure Island Facing the Flag On Stranger Tides Jim Hawkins and the Curse of Treasure Island Castaways of the Flying Dutchman The Angel’s Command Voyage of Slaves Long John Silver Pirate Latitudes Mistress of the Seas Silver: Return to Treasure Island Tropes Buried treasure Davy Jones Locker Eyepatch Jolly Roger skull and crossbones Marooning No purchase, no pay Pegleg Pet parrot Pirate code Pirate utopia Treasure map Walking the plank Miscellaneous Air pirate Space pirate International Talk Like a Pirate Day Pirates versus Ninjas Miscellaneous A General History of the Pyrates Captain Charles Johnson Truce of Ratisbon Pirate Round Mutiny Davy Jones’ Locker Matelotage Piracy kidnappings MetaLists Pirates Pirate films and TV series Privateers List of ships attacked by Somali pirates Timeline of piracy Women in piracy Categories Barbary pirates By nationality Female pirates Fictional pirates Piracy Piracy by year Pirates Piracy portal Category Authority control databases International VIAF National France BnF data Germany Tortuga Lighthouse (east point) Admiralty J5414 NGA Retrieved from “https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Tortuga_(Haiti)&oldid=1185946255” Categories: Pages using infobox lighthouse with custom Wikidata itemTortuga (Haiti)1625 establishments in the French colonial empireCommunes of HaitiGeography of HispaniolaIslands of HaitiPirate dens and locationsPiracy in the CaribbeanLighthouses in HaitiNord-Ouest (department)Island countriesHidden categories: Articles with short descriptionShort description is different from WikidataCoordinates on WikidataArticles containing French-language textPages with French IPAArticles containing Haitian Creole-language textArticles containing Spanish-language textPages with Spanish IPAInfobox mapframe without OSM relation ID on WikidataAll articles using infobox lighthouseCommons category link is on WikidataArticles with Spanish-language sources (es)Articles with VIAF identifiersArticles with BNF identifiersArticles with BNFdata identifiersArticles with GND identifiersArticles with admiralty identifiersArticles with NGA identifiersPages using the Kartographer extension This page was last edited on 19 November 2023, at 23:37 (UTC). 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Autour des activités du plus grand parc de loisirs couvert de Lille et sa région, profitez d’une pause pour vous restaurer et prenez le temps de déguster nos burgers et poke bowls 100% maison de la Taverne de la Tortue, notre espace de restauration et snack avec wifi gratuit. Pour votre confort, notre parc à thèmes est insonorisé, chauffé l’hiver et climatisé l’été, et vous propose de nombreuses places de parkings et dispose d’un espace tables et chaises adapté pour accueillir 450 adultes. Dès aujourd’hui, retrouvez toutes nos indications d’accès et de tarifs pour préparer votre première visite. un anniversaire inoubliable De 9 à 40 enfants, nous avons la solution pour faire de l’anniversaire de votre enfant une réussite ! Et pour cela nous nous occupons de toute la décoration et de l’organisation si vous choisissez de louer une salle d’anniversaire pour enfant. 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Gérer les options Gérer les services Gérer {vendor_count} fournisseurs En savoir plus sur ces finalités Accepter Refuser Voir les préférences Enregistrer les préférences Voir les préférences Politique de cookies Politique de Confidentialité {title} Aller au contenu 7/7 – 9h30 à 20h Chaussettes obligatoires Restauration sur place Picnic interdit Chaussettes obligatoires Picnic interdit Actualités Attractions Restauration évènements Anniversaire Privatisation Infos Pratiques Tarifs Accès Contact Menu Actualités Attractions Restauration évènements Anniversaire Privatisation Infos Pratiques Tarifs Accès Contact Réservationanniversaire Actualités Attractions Restauration évènements Anniversaire Privatisation Infos Pratiques Tarifs Accès Contact Menu Actualités Attractions Restauration évènements Anniversaire Privatisation Infos Pratiques Tarifs Accès Contact Réservationanniversaire Actualités Attractions Restauration évènements Anniversaire Privatisation Infos Pratiques Tarifs Accès Contact Menu Actualités Attractions Restauration évènements Anniversaire Privatisation Infos Pratiques Tarifs Accès Contact Réservationanniversaire L’île de Tortuga parc de jeux indoor Swing, le premier Mini-Golf interactif de Genève !Découvrez le !Des attractions pour tous !Découvrez lesOuvert 365 jours par anVenir au parc Diapositive précédente Diapositive suivante Bien préparer ma venue au parc Horaires Plan du Parc Venir au parc Se restaurer ☠️✨ Capitaine Jack Sparrow is back at Tortuga Vétraz! ✨☠️ décembre 14, 2023 Lire la suite » Monsieur Tony Stark en personne ! février 6, 2023 Lire la suite » Ohé Moussaillon ! février 6, 2023 Lire la suite » Venez retrouver les Transformers ! février 6, 2023 Lire la suite » Bienvenue à l’ile de tortuga ! Situé à Vetraz-Monthoux aux portes de Genève, le plus grand parc de loisirs couvert de France et de Suisse pour les enfants de 0 à 14 ans vous séduira, vous et vos enfants.Dans un environnement sécurisé, propre et ludique, vous pourrez participer à leurs jeux ou vous détendre. Un accès wifi haut débit gratuit vous est proposé ainsi qu’un snack de qualité avec choix de paninis, hot dog et salades ou une plus grosse faim avec nuggets, burgers et frites lors de l’ouverture de notre cuisine. Nul besoin de passer du temps à vous garer, un parking de 200 places est à votre disposition. TOUT EST pensé pour vous ! Pour votre confort, notre parc à thèmes est insonorisé, chauffé l’hiver et climatisé l’été et dispose d’un espace tables et chaises adapté pour accueillir 450 adultes. un anniversaire inoubliable De 8 à 80 enfants, nous avons la solution pour faire de l’anniversaire de votre enfant une réussite ! Et pour cela nous nous occupons de toute la décoration et de l’organisation si vous choisissez de louer une salle d’anniversaire pour enfant. Moussaillon Une formule avec gâteau, boissons, bonbons et les entrées pour tous les enfants Je réserve Pirate Comme la Moussaillon mais avec un gâteau pâtissier et un paquet de chips par enfant Je réserve Capitaine Comme la Pirate mais avec mais avec l’accrobranche OU 1 jeton hélicoptère et 1 jeton karting par enfant, photo, 1 sachet surprise par enfant, 1 entrée gratuite tout est inclus! Je réserve Privatisation du parc Une formule avec gâteau, boissons, bonbons et les entrées pour tous les enfants Je réserve 7/7 – 9h30 à 20h Chaussettes obligatoires Restauration sur place Picnic interdit Chaussettes obligatoires De 0 à 77 ans Restauration sur place Ouvert 7/7 de 9h30 à 20h Picnic Interdit nous retrouver Anniversaires Restauration Privatisation FAQ Avis des visiteurs Conditions de vente Politique de confidentialité Mentions légales Cookies RETROUVEZ NOUS 10 allée des chênes 74 100 VETRAZ-MONTHOUX +33 (0)4 50 92 66 04 [email protected] Facebook Instagram Ce site a été réalisé par Bluekat Digital © 2022 Gérer le consentement Tortue Island | Caribbean, Haiti, Nature | Britannica Search Britannica Click here to search Search Britannica Click here to search Login Subscribe Now Subscribe Home Games & Quizzes History & Society Science & Tech Biographies Animals & Nature Geography & Travel Arts & Culture Money Videos On This Day One Good Fact Dictionary New Articles History & Society Lifestyles & Social Issues Philosophy & Religion Politics, Law & Government World History Science & Tech Health & Medicine Science Technology Biographies Browse Biographies Animals & Nature Birds, Reptiles & Other Vertebrates Bugs, Mollusks & Other Invertebrates Environment Fossils & Geologic Time Mammals Plants Geography & Travel Geography & Travel Arts & Culture Entertainment & Pop Culture Literature Sports & Recreation Visual Arts Companions Demystified Image Galleries Infographics Lists Podcasts Spotlights Summaries The Forum Top Questions #WTFact 100 Women Britannica Kids Saving Earth Space Next 50 Student Center Home Games & Quizzes History & Society Science & Tech Biographies Animals & Nature Geography & Travel Arts & Culture Money Videos Tortue Island Table of Contents Tortue Island Table of Contents Introduction References & Edit History Related Topics Quizzes Islands and Archipelagos Related Questions What is a major feature of the seafloor of the Atlantic Ocean? What is the salinity of the Atlantic Ocean? Read Next 8 of the World’s Most-Remote Islands Just How Many Oceans Are There? Is Australia an Island? Which Waters Do You Pass Through When You “Sail the Seven Seas”? What Is Known (and Not Known) About the Bermuda Triangle Discover Shorthair Cat Breeds Do We Really Swallow Spiders in Our Sleep? Where Is the Ark of the Covenant? 6 Cultures That Recognize More than Two Genders 9 of the World’s Deadliest Mammals How Oprah Got Sued for Dissing a Burger 9 of the World’s Deepest Lakes Home Geography & Travel Physical Geography of Land Islands & Archipelagos Geography & Travel Tortue Island island, Haiti Actions Cite Share Give Feedback External Websites Print Cite Share Feedback External Websites Also known as: Île de la Tortue, Isla de la Tortuga Written and fact-checked by The Editors of Encyclopaedia Britannica Encyclopaedia Britannica’s editors oversee subject areas in which they have extensive knowledge, whether from years of experience gained by working on that content or via study for an advanced degree. They write new content and verify and edit content received from contributors. The Editors of Encyclopaedia Britannica Last Updated: Article History Table of Contents Category: Geography & Travel French: Île de la Tortue (Show more) Spanish: Isla de la Tortuga (Show more) See all related content → Tortue Island, Caribbean island off the northern coast of Haiti opposite Port-de-Paix. European adventurers settled Tortue in 1629, in conjunction with trying to establish a foothold on the neighbouring island of Hispaniola (now comprising Haiti and the Dominican Republic). Known as filibusters and buccaneers, these “Brethren of the Coast” harassed Spanish shipping. The English, French, and Spanish in turn dominated Tortue until the French gained permanent possession in 1665. In the 1880s France, Britain, and the United States considered the island, which is 20 miles (32 km) long by 3 miles (5 km) wide, strategically important, but thereafter it became of little value either in international affairs or in the Haitian economy. On its highest point is the small village of Palmiste. Britannica Quiz Islands and Archipelagos This article was most recently revised and updated by Maren Goldberg. Load Next Page Feedback Corrections? Updates? Omissions? Let us know if you have suggestions to improve this article (requires login). Feedback Type Select a type (Required) Factual Correction Spelling/Grammar Correction Link Correction Additional Information Other Your Feedback Submit Feedback Thank you for your feedback Our editors will review what you’ve submitted and determine whether to revise the article. Feedback Corrections? Updates? Omissions? Let us know if you have suggestions to improve this article (requires login). Feedback Type Select a type (Required) Factual Correction Spelling/Grammar Correction Link Correction Additional Information Other Your Feedback Submit Feedback Thank you for your feedback Our editors will review what you’ve submitted and determine whether to revise the article. verifiedCite While every effort has been made to follow citation style rules, there may be some discrepancies. Please refer to the appropriate style manual or other sources if you have any questions. Select Citation Style MLA APA Chicago Manual of Style Britannica, The Editors of Encyclopaedia. “Tortue Island”. Encyclopedia Britannica, 17 Jul. 2018, https://www.britannica.com/place/Tortue-Island. Accessed 29 December 2023. Copy Citation Share Share to social media Facebook Twitter URL https://www.britannica.com/place/Tortue-Island External Websites Michigan State University – The Kingdom of This World – Ile de la Tortue, Haiti The Way of the Pirates – Tortuga verifiedCite While every effort has been made to follow citation style rules, there may be some discrepancies. Please refer to the appropriate style manual or other sources if you have any questions. Select Citation Style MLA APA Chicago Manual of Style Britannica, The Editors of Encyclopaedia. “Tortue Island”. Encyclopedia Britannica, 17 Jul. 2018, https://www.britannica.com/place/Tortue-Island. Accessed 29 December 2023. Copy Citation Share Share to social media Facebook Twitter URL https://www.britannica.com/place/Tortue-Island External Websites Michigan State University – The Kingdom of This World – Ile de la Tortue, Haiti The Way of the Pirates – Tortuga Parcs Tortuga – L’île de Tortuga – Parcs de loisirs partout en France Retrouvez nos parcs dans toute la France TORTUGA VETRAZ TORTUGA LILLE TORTUGA SAINT ETIENNE Play Video Tortuga (Haiti) – Simple English Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to content Main menu Main menu move to sidebar hide Getting around Main pageSimple startSimple talkNew changesShow any pageHelpContact usGive to WikipediaAbout Wikipedia Languages Language links are at the top of the page across from the title. Search Search Create account Log in Personal tools Create account Log in Pages for logged out editors learn more ContributionsTalk Contents move to sidebar hide Beginning 1Geography 2Population 3History 4Tourism 5References Toggle the table of contents Tortuga (Haiti) 44 languages العربيةBân-lâm-gúБеларускаяБеларуская (тарашкевіца)БългарскиBrezhonegCatalàCebuanoČeštinaDanskDeutschΕλληνικάEnglishEspañolEsperantoEuskaraفارسیFrançais한국어ՀայերենHrvatskiBahasa IndonesiaItalianoעבריתKiswahiliKreyòl ayisyenLatinaLietuviųMagyarمصرىNederlands日本語Norsk bokmålNorsk nynorskPolskiPortuguêsRomânăРусскийСрпски / srpskiSuomiSvenskaTürkçeУкраїнська中文 Change links PageTalk English ReadChangeChange sourceView history Tools Tools move to sidebar hide Actions ReadChangeChange sourceView history General What links hereRelated changesUpload fileSpecial pagesPermanent linkPage informationCite this pageGet shortened URLWikidata item Edit interlanguage linksSandbox Print/export Make a bookDownload as PDFPage for printing In other projects Wikimedia Commons Coordinates: 20°02′23′′N 72°47′24′′W / 20.03972°N 72.79000°W / 20.03972; -72.79000 From Simple English Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Tortuga Île de la TortueTurtle IslandIslandTortuga seen from spaceTortugaA map of Haiti with Île de la Tortue to the north.Coordinates: 20°02′23′′N 72°47′24′′W / 20.03972°N 72.79000°W / 20.03972; -72.79000CountryHaitiDepartmentNord-OuestArrondissementPort-de-PaixSettled1625Area • Total180 km2 (69 sq mi)Elevation459 m (1,506 ft)Population (2003) • Total25,936 • Density144/km2 (376/sq mi)Time zone−5 • Summer (DST)−4ClimateAf Tortuga Island (French: Île de la Tortue, Haitian Creole: Il Latòti) is a Caribbean island that forms part of Haiti. It is off the northwest coast of Hispaniola. Its Taíno name was Baynei.[1] During the 17th century, the island was an important centre for Caribbean piracy where pirates traded their stolen goods from ships and towns and stayed for days before going out to try to capture other ships.[2] Geography[change | change source] In geology, it is considered as the western end of the region of the Cordillera Septentrional (“Northern mountain range”) of the Hispaniola island, even if Tortuga Island is separated from the main island.[3][4] Tortuga Island is separated of the north coast of Haiti by an 8.9 to 15 km strait called the Canal de la Tortue (“La Tortue Channel”). The island is 37.5 km long and about 7 km wide, with an area of 193 km2. There are not high mountains but most of the land is between 240 and 300 metres high; the highest point is Morne La Visite (340 m).[4] The island is a commune (like municipality), in the Nord Department. It is part of the Port-de-Paix arrondissement, part of a department like a district. Population[change | change source] In 2004, there were 30,000 people living in the Tortuga Island. There are only small towns; Aux Palmistes, in the southeast, is the biggest town in the island. History[change | change source] Christopher Columbus saw this island on 6 December 1492 and visited it on 14 December. He called the island La Tortuga, Spanish for “The Turtle”, because it has the shape, when seen from the sea, of a turtle.[5] Spanish people were not interested in Tortuga Island because they were trying to form a colony in the big Hispaniola island. And so this island was without people for most of the 16th century. People from different European countries, mainly from England, came to live in this island. In 1625, French people came to this island from the Saint Kitts island. They lived on the southern part of the island where there are flat lands and tried to grow some crops like tobacco. They also went to Hispaniola, which they called la Grande Terre (“the Big Land”) to hunt wild cows and pigs and, because they used a Taíno cooking technique with smoke known as “boucan”, they were known as boucaniers (“buccaneers”). They sold the smoked meat and leather (dry skin used to make footwear and clothing) to those ships that came to the island.[6][7] The Spanish tried to get those people out of the island and they invaded the island several times but each time they went back to the Hispaniola and the Tortuga Island was taken again. In 1640 a French engineer named Jean La Vasseur was sent to govern Tortuga. He built Fort de Rocher [1640]. La Vasseur opened the port to outlaws of all nations. From Tortuga Island, people began to move to the northern part of the Hispaniola, mainly in the areas around the big plains, founding towns such as Port-de-Paix (1665), Cap-Français (1670) and Fort-Dauphin (1731). Then Tortuga Island lost its importance and very few people have lived here after those years, including today. Tourism[change | change source] There are several good beaches in Tortuga Island; Point Saline, at the western tip, is considered by many to be the best beach of the island. At Basse-Terre, on the southeastern coast, there are still some rests of the Fort de la Roche built in 1630 by the French. There are several interesting caves such as La Grotte au Bassin, La Grotte de la Galerie and others. References[change | change source] ↑ As shown in a map made by Andrés Morales in 1508 and published in 1516. In Vega, Bernardo (1989). Los Cacicazgos de la Hispaniola. Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic: Museo del Hombre Dominicano. p. 88. ↑ “Method of Securing the Ports and Populations of All the Coasts of the Indies”. World Digital Library. 1694. Retrieved 2013-08-30. ↑ Butterlin, Jacques (1977). Géologie Structural de la Région des Caraïbes (in French). Paris: Masson. pp. 110–111. ISBN 2-225 44979-1. ↑ Jump up to: 4.0 4.1 Maurrasse, Florentin J-M.R. (1982). Survey of the Geology of Haiti. Guide to the Field Excursions in Haiti, March 3-8, 1982 (PDF). Miami: Miami Geological Society. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2008-10-07. Retrieved 2009-11-25. ↑ Columbus, Christopher (1991). The Diario of Christopher Columbus’s First Voyage to America, 1492-1493. de las Casas, Bartolomé; Dunn, O.C. and Kelley, James E. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press. ISBN 0806123842. ↑ de Saint-Méry, M.L.E. Moreau (1796). Description topographique et politique de la partie espagnole de l’isle Saint-Domingue (in French). Philadelphia, Paris, Hamburg. ↑ Moya Pons, Frank (1998). The Dominican Republic: a national history. Princeton: Markus Wiener Publishers. ISBN 1558761926. Retrieved from “https://simple.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Tortuga_(Haiti)&oldid=8991879” Category: Geography of HaitiHidden categories: CS1 French-language sources (fr)Coordinates on WikidataArticles containing French-language textArticles containing Haitian Creole-language text This page was last changed on 9 August 2023, at 12:46. Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License and the GFDL; additional terms may apply. See Terms of Use for details. Privacy policy About Wikipedia Disclaimers Code of Conduct Developers Statistics Cookie statement Mobile view Toggle limited content width Île de la Tortue | Haiti Local | Fandom Haiti Local Explore Main Page All Pages Community Interactive Maps Recent Blog Posts Wiki Content Recently Changed Pages City Lab Cancun Transit Academy Page Gens de couleur Croix-des-Bouquets Les Chardonnières Astrogeography Communal Sections Departments of Haiti Montrouis Limbé Island Administrative division Martissant Tiburon Morne l’Hôpital Ouest, Haiti Croix-des-Bouquets Arrondissement L’Arcahaie Arrondissement Arcahaie La Gonâve Arrondissement Léogâne Petit-Goâve Grand-Goâve Community Help FANDOM Fan Central BETA Games Anime Movies TV Video Wikis Explore Wikis Community Central Start a Wiki Don’t have an account? Register Sign In Advertisement Sign In Register Haiti Local 1,166pages Explore Main Page All Pages Community Interactive Maps Recent Blog Posts Wiki Content Recently Changed Pages City Lab Cancun Transit Academy Page Gens de couleur Croix-des-Bouquets Les Chardonnières Astrogeography Communal Sections Departments of Haiti Montrouis Limbé Island Administrative division Martissant Tiburon Morne l’Hôpital Ouest, Haiti Croix-des-Bouquets Arrondissement L’Arcahaie Arrondissement Arcahaie La Gonâve Arrondissement Léogâne Petit-Goâve Grand-Goâve Community Help in: Nord-Ouest, Haiti, Geography of Haiti Île de la Tortue Edit Edit source View history Talk (0) Tortuga (or Tortuga Island) (French: Île de la Tortue, Kreyol: Latòti; Spanish: Isla Tortuga, English: Turtle Island) is a Caribbean island that forms part of Haiti, off the northwest coast of Hispaniola. It constitutes the commune of Tortuga in the Port-de-Paix Arrondissement of Haiti’s Nord-Ouest department. Île de la Tortue, Nord-Ouest, Haiti Location in The Carribean Sea, Haiti, and from above Île de la Tortue Country Haiti Department Nord-Ouest Arrondissement Port-de-Paix Settled December 6th 1492Settled 1625 Area 180 km2 (69 sq mi) Population (2015) 25,936 (2003) Density 144/km2 (376/sq mi) Contents 1 About 2 History 3 Geography 4 See also 5 External links About[] This large and beautiful island, adjacent to the Republic of Haiti, is located at a distance from the coasts of the North West Department, across from Port-de-Paix. It is 9 leagues long and 3000 toises (3.6 miles) of average breadth. The channel or strait which separates it from the mainland between Cap Rouge and the eastern point of the tortoise is 16 kilometers (10 miles) wide; it narrows down in the middle to 8 kilometers. The Moniteur of March 2, 1918 published an order revoking the authorization given to the Compagnie d’Exploitation de l’Ile de Ia Tortue and foreclosing the contracts concerning the concession of November 14, 1899 and September 1, 1915, pending the violation of the laws and statutes relating to the said company. History[] Named by Columbus, who, upon happening on the isle in 1492, forming out of the mist of the morning, likened its shape to that of a turtle, it was initially settled by colonists from Spain, but, first made a colony of Santo Domingo by the French. More people would eventually come, as, in the first quarter of the 1600’s, additional French settlers, along with some English ones, would travel there. These new residents would, however, face an attack four years later by Don Fadrique de Toledo, who would see to their expulsion before fortifying the island. Mid History It wasn’t until the 17th and 18th centuries that the island became synonymous with pirates. French, English and a smaller concentration of Dutch pirates would use Tortuga as their operations base, and the island quickly got the reputation for ill-repute often associated with locales considered the pirate capital of their regions. Modern Times Today, Tortuga has left its buccaneer past behind and has become synonymous with mountains, beaches and other natural attractions that make it a great tourist destination. With a population of just over 35,000 people, recorded in 2009, the tiny island is the perfect getaway for those seeking a Caribbean beach vacation Geography[] Île de la Tortue is 459 m (1,506 ft) above sea level. The ground, steep on one side, rises on the other, gradually from the coast to the hill which occupies more or less the central regions. The tropical greenery spreads out there in all its magnificence: there are trees suitable for naval and civil constructions, for cabinetmaking and carpentry. Wild animals include oxen, horses, and a species of red crabs with a delicate taste. Fishing is the main industry for the inhabitants of the island. Its coasts provide a lot of sponge and carets. Its surface area is 11,734 squares of land Administrative divisions Île de la Tortue is coterminous with the commune of Tortuga, which is split into two communal sections; Pointe des Oiseax and Mare Rouge. See also[] Buccaneers Piracy in the Caribbean External links[] http://web.archive.org/20060208202126/www.geocities.com/Tokyo/Garden/5213/ Michael Vedrine Categories Categories: Nord-Ouest, Haiti Geography of Haiti Add category Cancel Save Community content is available under CC-BY-SA unless otherwise noted. Advertisement Fan Feed More Haiti Local 1 Croix-des-Bouquets 2 Vieux Bourg D’Aquin 3 Delmas Explore properties Fandom Muthead Fanatical Follow Us Overview What is Fandom? About Careers Press Contact Terms of Use Privacy Policy Global Sitemap Local Sitemap Community Community Central Support Help Do Not Sell or Share My Personal Information Advertise Media Kit Contact Fandom Apps Take your favorite fandoms with you and never miss a beat. Haiti Local is a FANDOM Lifestyle Community. View Mobile Site Follow on IG TikTok Join Fan Lab Tortuga (Haiti) – Travel guide at Wikivoyage 20.0667-72.8167 From Wikivoyage North America > Caribbean > Haiti > Northern Haiti > Tortuga (Haiti) Tortuga Contents 1 Understand 1.1 Talk 2 Get in 3 Get around 4 See 5 Do 6 Buy 7 Eat 8 Drink 9 Sleep 10 Connect 11 Stay safe 12 Go next Jump to navigation Jump to search Tortuga (French: Île de la Tortue) is an island just north of the Haitian mainland. Understand[edit]The island was named “tortuga” (Spanish for turtle) by Christopher Columbus, who discovered it during one of his voyages. It soon after became a haven for pirates. It fell outside the jurisdiction of the East India Trade Company and Royal Navy, so anarchy and unruliness became the norm. It was featured in the modern-day film, Pirates of the Caribbean. Talk[edit]You won’t have problems finding English-speaking people here. Communication is very easy on the island compared to the rest of the country. Get in[edit][add listing]There are boats from nearby Port-de-Paix to Basse-Terre, a coastal fishing port on the island. Transport is then possible to the nearby local capital via a little dinghy that brings you to a set of moored sailboats that set sail to the island when full. Foreigners (identified as anyone with white skin) pay more for passage. If you want to visit the island on a day trip, go as early as possible. Get around[edit][add listing]20°0′8′′N 72°47′27′′WMap of Tortuga (Haiti)Public transport is done by motorbikes. The prices can be a bit funny. Lots of negotiating might be required. You might see one car but there are no taxis. To get to the other side of the island is too steep for motorbikes, so you can go with them to a certain point, and then walk from there. There are no more motorbikes after the last sailboat arrival, or after dark. See[edit][add listing]The island has pristine beaches, which you will probably have all to yourself. Along with this, there are a few public buildings including churches and a school. Do[edit][add listing] Buy[edit][add listing] Eat[edit][add listing]You can find shacks. There might be a proper restaurant in one of the hotels up on the hill. Drink[edit][add listing]Not much of a nightlife on Tortuga: the island basically closes down between sunset and sunrise. The few bars on the island feature local and imported beer as well as hard liquor, but the stock is very limited. If they don’t have what you’re looking for, you can ask them to get it for you from the mainland. Most of the time you will end up paying in advance and then waiting a few hours till the next boat leaves and comes back. Sleep[edit][add listing]There are about three hotels, powered by generators which may or may not have fuel at any given time. Don’t expect your room to have a ceiling fan, a working air conditioner, or even running water. Connect[edit][add listing]There is no electricity on the island. The little stores have solar panels (one normally), so at the bar there might be music and one light bulb lit up. However, cell phone reception (with data!) is available. Just don’t expect to be able to charge your battery. Stay safe[edit]Unfortunately, the island has not departed from its old pirate days. It is still known as a hotspot for smuggling to America, and a number of drug lords live in huge mansions overlooking the ocean. Go next[edit]Haiti mainland This city travel guide to Tortuga is an outline and needs more content. It has a template, but there is not enough information present. Please plunge forward and help it grow! 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Details of contributors can be found in the article history. Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. Privacy policy About Wikivoyage Disclaimer Code of Conduct Developers Statistics Cookie statement Mobile view L’île de Tortuga | Savoie Mont Blanc (Savoie et Haute Savoie) – Alpes Go to the menuGo to the content Discover Great lakes Summer destination Winter mountains Activities Cycling Hiking Outdoor Snowsports Nordic Visits Gastronomy Your stay Book your activities Accommodation Things to do Events Contacts Ouvrir la modale de recherche fren Menu LeisureL’île de TortugaVisits and cultural sitesL’île de Tortuga © L’île de Tortuga Ile de Tortuga is the biggest covered theme park in France for children aged 1 to 12, situated at the entrance to Geneva! Leisure L’île de Tortuga Vétraz-Monthoux About Departing from Vétraz-Monthoux (74100) Animals not allowedSoundproofed, air-conditioned in summer and heated in winter with a magnificent pirate-theme decor. There are several play areas: – Foam baby gym for babies aged under one: – An area reserved for children aged from 1 to under 4 – A giant maze for children aged 4 to 12 with giant slides, suspension bridges, cannon balls, a giant volcano and lots of other surprises – Jump Arena with 16 trampolines – A pedal-helicopter which climbs to 5m above the park – indoor aerial trekking course which peaks at 8m All our attractions are designed so that parents can accompany their children. Access is allowed depending on crowds. Lire la suite Réduire Tips Organise your child’s birthday in one of our party rooms with our activity organisers!PricesChild: 14 € Reduced price: 9 €. Free entry for children < 1 years. Lire la suite Réduire Methods of payment accepted : Bank/credit card, CashReception Animals not allowed Languages spoken : English, FrenchPeriod of practiceAll year round between 9.30 am and 8 pm. Lire la suite Réduire Benefits ServicesWi-fiRestaurantFast food EquipmentsBarToiletsAir conditioningCar parkRestaurantPrivate parking ActivitiesActivityContacts 04 50 92 66 04 Contact by mail Access to the website Access 10 allée des Chênes 74100 Vétraz-Monthoux Departing from : Vétraz-Monthoux (74100) Latitude : 46.184734 – Longitude : 6.272093 Bus – “Chemin des teppes” stop 350 m away: access to TAC 5 line Open the map More informations Information update on 26/09/2023 by Office de Tourisme des Monts de Genève Follow us on Facebook – Le lien va s’ouvrir dans une nouvelle fênetre Instagram – Le lien va s’ouvrir dans une nouvelle fênetre Twitter – Le lien va s’ouvrir dans une nouvelle fênetre Youtube – Le lien va s’ouvrir dans une nouvelle fênetre Tiktok – Le lien va s’ouvrir dans une nouvelle fênetre ©2021 Savoie Mont Blanc Agency – All rights reserved Privacy policy and GDPR Legal notice Back Continue Discover our ski resorts Close Close Formulaire de contactContact SIT Last name * First name * Email * Phone number Subject * Message * Confidentiality * By checking this box and submitting this form, I agree that my personal data will be used to contact me as part of my request indicated in this form. 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